General Questions

How do I know if my septic tank is not working?

There are some sewage systems that are easy to diagnose as “not working” and there are also some systems that may need a trained eye to make the call. Below are some signs of sewage systems that may not be working: Blockages in manholes or slowly draining toilets. Wet patches in the garden - even in dry weather The septic tank requires frequent emptying Storm or Roof water entering the septic system or leaking manholes Wet areas in the garden around the septic tank or percolation area Lush green grass around the septic tank/soakaway, even during dry weather The presence of nitrates and bacteria in your drinking water test results The septic tank is connected to a ditch or stream Odours from the septic tank or around the house If your still not sure it is possible to get your sewage system visually assessed by Corcorcan Precast Tanks

What is a Percolation Test?

A percolation test is carried out to determine what type of sewage treatment system will be suitable for your property. The percolation test provides us with the soakage value of the soil, what depth the water table or bed is present at and a number of other factors. With these results and the assistance of Geological mapping we can provide you with the most suitable sewage system for your site.

Why do I need to carry out a Percolation Test?

Percolation tests are carried to determine the size required for the percolation area. The soakage of the soil in every site varies. Some sites have good soakage and some are very poor. Therefore a single solution can't be offered to everyone. It is crucial to carry out a percolation test in order to know how good your soil soaks and to determine the maximum height of the water table (in order to maintain relevant separations as per the EPA Code of Practice 2009). A percolation test is required by law in order to apply for planning permission. Sepcon have a dedicated team that will assist in providing the relevant site assessment information and documents in order to lodge your planning application. Contact us today to discuss your individual requirements.

What is the difference between a septic tank & a treatment Unit?

A septic tank normally consists of two chambers. The first chamber holds the solid waste and the second chamber holds the partially treated effluent. The effluent then enters the percolation area where further treatment takes place. Septic tanks are suitable for sites with a good soil soakage rate. A sewage treatment unit normally consists of 3 or more chambers. The first chamber holds the solid waste, the second is where the effluent treatment takes place and the the third is the final settlement chamber. Treatment units are ideals for sites with poor soakage as the effluent quality is better upon discharge to the percolation area.

If you have any more questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us.